BPM Futures



“Agile” – time for a change


Back in the early 90s we used to demonstrate workflow by building a 3-step ‘Leave Application’ process from scratch, run it from the user perspective, change it, then run it again. The message, reinforced by our patter and marketing collateral, was clear – workflow was Agile. And you can read the same from every BPM vendor today – BPM will result in (or facilitate, support – pick your own weasel word) Agility.

The reality is rather different. Most operations managers have to prioritise the changes they need to their BPM system and these typically get delivered according to a release schedule that is measured in weeks rather than hours.

Why? Well, there’s the complexity – of real business processes that are usually much more complex than their users first thought, defined in tools that are smart but not quite perfect (think workarounds), including multiple integration points (so we may need to change the Java code too), and a user interface that is shared with other systems and environments. So the typical end result of a single process implementation is something that is quite hard to ‘get your head around’ and requires special skills to change. For a multi-process deployment, this gets even harder.  And this complexity of interacting components results in genuine risk – of developer error, of user error (in terms of clearly thinking through what is required), and of deployment error.

These risks are typically mitigated through a series of tests. Systems Testing is specifically designed to test that the changed components work together as expected by the developer. Regression testing will test that the rest of the system has not been impacted by the change. Acceptance testing ensures that the user gets what they (thought they) asked for, and gives them a chance to change their minds. And post-implementation verification testing validates that the smorgasbord of changed components that has been deployed hasn’t destabilized the live system. All of this testing and deployment activity takes time and is more efficiently carried out on batches of process changes, rather than one change at a time. The actual deployment may well need to happen outside of working hours, too, as a further risk mitigation strategy. It therefore tends to happen every few weeks, not daily.

Is this inevitable? I don’t think so. After all, there are some changes that are always carried out swiftly – on the same day or, at worst, overnight. Adding a new user, complete with a required permissions profile, will have significantly complex effects – not only on that user’s system access, but also on reporting, enquiries, and supervisor access – but is typically carried out within hours. Why shouldn’t the same apply to process changes?

The answer, today, is that your current BPM solution – typically a BPM product that has been configured, customized and extended to meet your requirements –will not have been designed to support true Agility.

Does any of this matter? Well, think back to the much-derided paper-based process that the BPM system replaced. The process was largely determined by the contents of a tick sheet stapled to the front of the manila folder that contained the case documents. The users knew the process rules, which were based upon what was ticked and what wasn’t.  So changing the process involved changing the tick sheet (thanks, MS Word) and giving new instructions to the team. It could be done in hours. Sure, the end result was much more error prone, less efficient and lacking in MIS. But are we currently trading enormous improvements in all of these, when we deploy BPM, for a loss in agility?

I believe this to be the single biggest challenge to BPM, with truly agile BPM providing potentially one of the most radical changes that technology can contribute to business processing. As an industry, can we rise to the challenge? What did The Man say….? Yes We Can?

To be continued. Happy trails….

Advertisements

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

Comments

  1. * domain says:

    Woah! I’m really loving the template/theme of this site.
    It’s simple, yet effective. A lot of times it’s
    very difficult to get that “perfect balance” between user friendliness and visual
    appearance. I must say you’ve done a superb job with this.
    Also, the blog loads super fast for me on Internet explorer.
    Excellent Blog!

    | Reply Posted 2 years, 11 months ago


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: